Dr. Alan H. Goldstein

biomanScience Salon

Dear Mechanics' Institute Science Salon members,

Welcome to my world!
On this page you will find links to articles that we will discuss in future MI Science Salons along with a link to my blog where we can have an ongoing dialog about Science Salon topics. I hope this new interactive format will allow the MI Science Salon to move into a new interactive format where we can continue to teach and learn from one another throughout the year.
Best regards,

Dr. Alan H Goldstein


The Science Salon Meets the
Third Friday of Each Month at the Mechanics' Institute.

mecanics instituteMECHANICS' INSTITUTE
57 Post Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
Reservation & Information (415) 393-0100.

Facilited by Dr. Alan Goldstein
Professor of Biomaterials Engineering, Alfred University, NY

 

Article Download: Functional Arteries Grown in Vitro.


You must agree to download: Functional Arteries Grown in Vitro.pdf
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".

 

May 18th, 2007 Science Salon

Mnemosyne Rising: Biotechnology and the race to develop memory-enhancing drugs.

Mnemosyne, mainly remembered as the mother of the Muses, was also the Greek goddess of memory. As such, she was considered one of the most powerful deities of her time. After all, it is memory that distinguishes us from the other creatures in the animal world. It is the gift that allows us to reason, to predict and anticipate outcomes... the very foundation for civilization.

Driven by the intense interest in curing Alsheimer's disease and the desire to attenuate the general effects of aging on memory, 'memory-drugs' have entered the scientific mainstream. But success in this area of research poses an immediate 'neuroethical' dilemma since it is highly probable that any biopharmaceutical strategy that can maintain a deteriorating memory will - at the very least - provide leads for drugs that enhance 'healthy' memory.

So, regardless of the myraid bioethical considerations, there?s been an explosion of new drug candidates designed to boost memory in recent years, and many are entering clinical trials. Although a few elixirs have already fallen by the wayside, observers see encouraging signs in the breadth and depth of clinical experimentation. Although big pharmaceutical firms are heavily involved, some of the most ambitious efforts are led by small companies, each tied to a prominent academic scientist and backed by a famous institution.

The May 18th Science Salon will focus on the face of Mnemosyne in 21st century. A general review article will be posted for downloading on Dr. Goldstein's Science Salon web site. In addition to a survey of the current race to produce memory enhancing drugs, we will discuss the recent report by the President's Council on Bioethics which attempts to address the rapidly approaching day when society will need to decide whether drugs and other therapies developed to restore memory may also be used to enhance it. If knowledge is power, then memory may be the the 'generator' of this power. Who will end up operating the generator?

The article by Eliot Marshall (written for Science and available for downloading below) will be our jumping off point. At the May 18th Salon I will explain the biopharmaceutical basis for this effort and provide a brief summary of the current state of the race to create 'memory drugs'.

Article Download: Memory Enhancing Drugs by Eliot Marshall.


You must agree to download:Memory Enhancing Drugs.pdf (340KB)
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".


 

"From Brain Dynamics To Consciousness", Gerald Edelman, The Neurosciences Institute. Given as Lecture 1 of 12 of IBM Research's Almaden Institute Conference on Cognitive Computing.
May 10, 2006

 


Current Articles:

Article Download: Consciousness and Complexity: Giulio Tononi & Gerald M. Edelman

Conventional approaches to understanding consciousness are generally concerned with the contribution of specific brain areas or groups of neurons. By contrast, it is considered here what kinds of neural processes can account for key properties of conscious experience. Applying measures of neural integration and complexity, together with an analysis of extensive neurological data, leads to a testable proposal--the dynamic core hypothesis--about the properties of the neural substrate of consciousness. Science 4 December 1998: Vol. 282. no. 5395, pp. 1846 - 185.


You must agree to download: Consciousness and Complexity.pdf (556 KB)
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".

 

Article Download: Where Memories Are Made. from Scientific American. September 26, 2000.


You must agree to download: How Does the Brain Organize Memories?pdf. (153KB)
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".

Article Download: How Does the Brain Organize Memories? Howard Eichenbaum.


You must agree to download: How Does the Brain Organize Memories?pdf. (153KB)
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".

 

Article Download: Brain on the Stand from New York Times Magazine.


You must agree to download: Brain on the Stand pdf. (932KB)
By downloading this article I agree to use it only for the educational purposes associated with the Science Salon hosted by Professor Alan H Goldstein at the Mechanics' Institute Library as allowed by the 'minimum standards of fair use' set forth in the "Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions".

 


Past Events:

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